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Can You Put a Hot Tub on Grass? – ToiletsGuide

Can You Put a Hot Tub on Grass
Written by Joe Richter

In short, no. You should not place your hot tub straight on the grass because the bare ground may be uneven and there will be a constant risk of flooding. The surface under the tub will be a mess too and if you have a wooden frame, it might start to rot sooner than your expectations.

Different ground conditions to consider

  • Natural grass

As you can guess, natural grass is not a good idea because standard hot tubs are heavy bowls of water with electrical components. and most of them require ground wiring. The condition of the bare ground or natural grass may change when water is spilled from the tub.

But you’ll be fine if yours is a Dutch tub that you have to use manually and burn wood to heat up the water.

  • Artificial grass

An artificial lawn has the ability to hold your hot tub or above-ground pool. But the surface needs to be leveled and strong enough to support the weight of the tub full of water and people.

Keep in mind that your lawn blades under the tub will be flattened to earth if you choose this as a permanent space to place the tub.

Can You Put an Inflatable Hot Tub on the Grass?

You can temporarily place a standard inflatable hot tub on a flat ground, lawn, or grass as most of them are portable as well.

But if it’s a big 7-8 people unit, you should not keep your tub for more than 7 days that way. Otherwise, it might get ripped at the seams due to the unstable distribution of weight on all sides.

Can you put a hot tub on bare ground?

A hot tub on bare ground is a complete no-no. The soil is not appropriate because the tub will gradually sink into the ground after a while, thanks to the weight and water. You’ll have the same experience of placing it on the grass.

However, you can only do it with professional help and thoroughgoing customization of the surface beneath. Also, you’ll need a custom-made 3-5 people unit with a special indisposable framing.

The bigger the size, the tougher it will be to keep the tub intact on bare ground.

  • Avoid slopes

The base for the tub needs to be totally even and flat. Even a slight slope can be hazardous.  The tub can collapse when filled with water if the structural integrity is compromised.

  • Get past weight shifts

Make sure the ground is completely level before putting the tub on it and pay attention as you fill water. Try bulging the tub in a specific direction if you notice the water level is not the same on all the sides.

  • Change placement

If you’ve tried everything you could possibly do but failed to keep the water leveled, it’s a good idea to move the tub to another place.

What sort of base do you need for a hot tub?

Hot tubs are heavy objects. A standard six-seat tub can roughly weigh up to a staggering 6,000 lbs and more when full.

On average, the base should have the ability to tackle at least 100 lbs of load per square foot. So, it’s vital to put up an exceptionally resilient and supportive base that won’t move or disintegrate easily.

Reliable Hot tub Base options

  • Concrete base

A concrete base is the best choice for backyards and a construction company can help you just with that.

But if you can’t afford professionals and want to go DIY, first select the area and dig down 8-12 inches from the surface. Get the thick plastic paper spread out. Embed a layer of crushed stones and set the pre-made concrete pads together on them to form a base.

Note: A bit of research can help you with the perfect base construction for a hot tub by yourself.

  • Patio, Block paving

If you already have a sturdy masonry yard, just go ahead and put the tub on a spot you see fits best. Any stony and level surface will be a great option to use as a hot tub base.

  • Deck with adequate structural support

If a deck can support at least 100 lbs of weight per square foot, you can use it as a base for your hot tub. Add some extra support blocks under the selected spot to make the deck more strong.

  • Pea gravel

Gravels and crushing stones come with a few advantages. They are less expensive than concrete, flexible in size, good for water drainage, and aesthetically pleasing.

First, empty the ground, place the plastic core base evenly, top off the core with pea gravel, and place the tub on it.

 Note: Add a wooden frame around to stop the stones from spreading all over the place.

  • Stone Surface

A stone surface will be perfect as long as it is completely flat and not sloppy. Add a plastic mat for slight adjustments if you can’t directly place the tub on a marginal rough texture.

  • Interlocking tiles

Modern composite interlocking waterproof tiles can be your choice for outdoors. Some of them are even non-slip dedicated to hot tubs.

They are a smart option if you are renting the place. They come in a box and you can easily interlock them together to form a solid base.

  • Synthetic hot tub pads

These are ready-made interlocking hot tub bases that you can easily pick up online or at any local spa store. They’re a larger cousin of interlocking tiles.

Try them out if you are thinking of placing the tub on your artificial lawn or a similar surface.

FAQs

Q. What can I put under my grass in the hot tub?

You can try gravels since they arrange for constant drainage, have a pleasing appearance, cost relatively less, and are extremely popular today.

Q. Can I put a hot tub on paving slabs?

Absolutely! Paving slabs will be perfect to put a hot on as long as they’re even and flat. So the water doesn’t cause pressure in one specific direction which can eventually damage your tub.

Q. Will a hot tub ruin my patio?

Most patios can hold hot tubs without a problem. It will be wise to reinforce the patio before placing your tub in case the patio is weak and cannot tackle 100 lbs of load per square foot.

Q. Will hot tub water hurt the grass?

No! But only the grasses that were in the place of the tub will be harmed. In fact, you can use your normal hot tub water to feed the lawn, flowers, and trees.

About the author

Joe Richter

Academically brilliant, technically flawless and professionally successful, Joe Richter is Toiletsguide’s head of the market research team. He studied Business Studies from the University of Houston and started his professional career as a Market Data Compliance Analyst in the stock market. He’s been following the updates on the bathroomware industries for a long time now and his elaborate studies have profoundly enriched his knowledge on the newer trends of toilets, showers, and related fittings. Apart from that, Joe goes around the street with his Leica Q2 taking pictures of people and buildings. He does most of the photography of the site.

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